GAF Contractor’s Corner — A podcast for roofing professionals – GAF Blog

On GAF Contractor’s Corner we talk to roofing professionals about what’s driving their business. We explore successes, challenges, tips tools and more. The podcast is hosted by Don Kilcoyne and will feature interviews with contractors as well as experts on topics of use to contractors. Please join the discussion in the comments section, and subscribe at iTunes or wherever you get your podcasts. Feel free to email your questions and comments to ryan.brenner@gaf.com.


Episode 1: Serving the Community, with guest Dior Vass of Dior Construction. diorconstruction.com | info@diorconstruction.com

Dior Vass is a Master Elite contractor based in Paramus, NJ. Founded in 2010, Dior Construction has roughly doubled in size every year. Despite the frantic pace of growth, Dior maintains a firm commitment to give back to his community. And when it comes to marketing, he applies a unique mix of old-school shoe leather, excellent word of mouth and cutting-edge digital social media.

Check out Dior’s stories about working with Habitat for Humanity and Roof for Troops, as well as the many digital and traditional communications platforms he uses to grow his business. And find out what to means to be able to present yourself as a GAF Master Elite in the competitive roofing marketplace and why Dior feels NRCA membership is so important to roofers who care about quality in their work.

Listen here or on your favorite podcast service.


http://blog.gaf.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/001-serving-the-community-with-dior-vass.mp3

Topics discussed: 

(0:00) Intro
(1:00) Giving back to the community
(5:55) Pride in one’s work
(7:59) Marketing strategies
(9:24) Word of mouth
(10:38) Being a Master Elite
(11:52) Finding employees
(13:33) Get involved with the community
(15:04) Invest in yourself
(16:18) Social media and SEO

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When the Job Ladder is an Actual Ladder: 200,000 construction jobs and still no takers. – GAF Blog

First posted in June 2017, this article has been updated with 2018 data including findings from the GAF Contractor Labor Shortage Survey conducted at the 2018 GAF Wealth Builder conference, current industry trends, and recent insights from NRCA CEO Reid Ribble. A condensed version of this updated post recently appeared on the NRCA Roof Scoop Blog.  

In addition, the GAF labor recruitment video, Join the Crew, earned an Emmy award on April 15, 2018 for the GAF Video Production team. 

It seems everybody wants to climb the job ladder, but no one wants to climb a ladder on the job.

Right now, roughly 200,000 construction jobs sit unfilled in the United States. The demand for residential homes is far outpacing our capacity to build them. A recent survey by HomeAdvisor lays it out in bleak terms: Of the firms surveyed, 93 percent said they believed the labor shortage is standing in the way of their growth.

Those findings were precisely echoed by the GAF Contractor Labor Shortage Survey, which found only 7% of contractors surveyed reported that the labor shortage was not having any impact on their businesses. The biggest issues identified were finding talent and project delays.

Today, thousands of small businesses from coast to coast are feeling the impact. Of the construction firms participating in the 2018 Construction Outlook Survey, 75 percent predicted a need to expand their headcount in 2018 — up two points from 2017. Unfortunately, “an overwhelming majority – 82 percent – of firms expect it will either become harder, or remain difficult to recruit and hire qualified workers in 2018, up from 76 percent last year.”1

In other words, three out of four of these firms see opportunity on the horizon, but only one in five believe they’ll be able to hire enough professionals to capitalize on it.

The GAF Weath Builder survey suggests a similar trend. More than two-thirds of responding contractors reported that the labor shortage has had a moderate or significant impact on their business. Difficulty finding talent and project delays were the biggest negative impacts.

Since there are so many more roofing jobs available than crews to install them, it has become, in many ways, a seller’s market for labor. Brad Corbin, president of Excel Roofing Systems in Fort Worth, Texas, has watched his competition poach entire roofing crews off of active jobs. “One day they’re working. The next they don’t show up because they were offered a few dollars more per square to do another job,” he said. “The majority of crews you find out there are brand new; some have never installed a roof before. That’s not the kind of crew I want to hire.” The shortage affects not only the number of roofs that get installed, but the type as well. “Subcontractors start picking and choosing what house they want to roof,” said Corbin. “If it’s too steep, they won’t do it. There’s plenty of jobs getting done at 4:12 (a gradual 18.5° slope), not at 12:12 (a steep 45°).”

Where have all the workers gone?

There are possibly as many theories about the vanishing labor force as there are jobs waiting to be filled. But labor and industry experts often cite these three factors as driving the phenomenon:

  • The Housing Bubble. During the housing crisis of 2006 – 2008, the construction industry lost approximately 40 percent of its workforce to other career paths, and those workers have, for the most part, not returned. Despite steady growth in demand for new houses, there is a lingering perception that construction — and residential construction in particular — is not a stable career choice. Making matters worse, when a million professionals walked away from construction, they took more than their nail guns with them. They took their hard-earned expertise as well.
  • Youth Perception. The perceived value of craft careers — and the training they demand — has suffered a dramatic downturn in recent decades. Not only has vocational education funding dried up in schools across the country, but the emphasis on “college for everyone” has created an impression that the trades are somehow less worthy career paths. Despite the popular desire for every young person to earn a college degree, more than 30 percent of American high school students never complete four years of college. That means they enter the job market with neither a college degree nor the skills-based training they need to thrive in construction, manufacturing, or other non-degree careers. And the general dismissal of craft occupations appears to be self-perpetuating. That is, the fewer people we prepare for careers in the trades, the less attractive those careers become. According to a 2017 poll of 2,001 young adults, ages 18 to 25, conducted for the National Association of Home Builders, only three percent of those with career plans saw themselves working in construction. When asked what motivated respondents to choose a career, 76 percent overall said the career was something they were interested in, and 48 percent said it suited their skills and abilities. Could this explain the lack of enthusiasm for craft careers? Can we expect students to dream of using skills that we no longer teach in their schools?

When asked what can be done to help the labor shortage, contractors participating in the GAF Wealth Builder survey most often indicated that focusing on trades in high school would be valuable.

When asked to rate their agreement with ways to improve the labor issues, shifting the perceptions of roofing with young people had the greatest level of agreement among respondents.

  • Changing Demographics. As political and law enforcement spotlights burn brightly on the complex challenges of the U.S. immigration policy, one fact remains indisputable: as the Baby Boom generation ages into retirement, new immigrants currently account for all of the growth in the labor force. Researchfrom the National Association of Home Builders indicates that nearly 30 percent of the U.S. construction labor force is foreign-born. For roofers, the number is even higher, at 43 percent. And overall, 53 percent of the immigrant labor force was born in Mexico. Yet immigration (authorized and unauthorized) has slowed significantly in recent years, putting additional stress on employers looking for skilled construction labor.

National challenges demand national solutions

The National Roofing Contractors Association has been confronting these issues aggressively under the leadership of CEO Reid Ribble. As a former roofing contractor and the U.S. Representative from Wisconsin’s 8th District, Ribble has studied the problem from both a professional and policy perspective.

Speaking to the immigration issue, he advocates a practical, economic growth based perspective. “Listening to some of the national rhetoric about immigration,” he said, “some have a tendency to demonize the immigrant who wants to work here. I understand the difference between an undocumented immigrant and one who comes here legally. The latter — the one coming here legally — came here to work. And that’s a good thing. When you consider the sheer demographics, ten thousand American workers are retiring every day. That’s going to continue for the next ten or thirteen years. Along with declining birth rates, that means we have to supplement our workforce with immigrant labor, because there simply will not be enough workers to grow the economy without them.”

He has also made industry perception a key focus of his work, recently concluding a nationwide tour of allied industry groups, trade gatherings such as the International Roofing Expo, and manufacturer conferences like GAF Wealth Builder. His consistent message has been a call to, “reevaluate how we see ourselves. We can’t expect anyone to respect what we do until we respect what we do. As we begin to shift our own attitude on what we do and the importance of our work the marketplace will automatically begin to follow us.”

“Let’s change the way the American people think about roofing” – Reid Ribble

“Let’s change the way the American people think about roofing,” he said. “Let’s reshape how moms and dads talk about us to their kids.” Older Americans remember roofing as dirty and smelly. “But that’s not today’s roofing industry. Fully one third of commercial roofs are actually white. Very specifically, these are clean roofs!” he said. The public also lacks awareness of the roofing industry’s proud position at the forefront of the sustainability movement, having pioneered zero-waste jobsite policies and developed modern “cool” roofs that are integral to increasing the energy efficiency of the building envelope.

“In order to change the conversation, we have to talk about ourselves differently. We cannot expect others to respect the work we do unless we respect ourselves,” said Ribble. By way of example, he often speaks about the comforts we have come to expect from life in 21st century America. “When you walk into a room and flip a switch, you just expect the lights to go on. When you flush a toilet or turn a tap, you expect the plumbing to respond. And when you call an electrician or a plumber, you look for a certified contractor.”

We expect our roofs to perform, as well, so why don’t we look for master-level certification of our roofers? The roofing industry, said Ribble, needs to increase the perceived value of what we do.

“When it’s storming outside, you expect it to be dry inside. When it’s cold outside, you expect the house to be warm. That professionalism is so ubiquitous that it’s become devalued. We live in comfort without recognizing the skill of the men and women who make it possible.”

To that end, the NCRA is spearheading an effort to establish a nationally recognized professional certification program, with uniform standards, for steep- and low-slope roofers. “Our goal is to be on…

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When the Job Ladder is an Actual Ladder

ladder

200,000 construction jobs and still no takers

A Guest Blog Post from GAF

First posted in June 2017, this article has been updated with 2018 data including findings from the GAF Contractor Labor Shortage Survey conducted at the 2018 GAF Wealth Builder conference, current industry trends, and insights from NRCA CEO Reid Ribble.

It seems everybody wants to climb the job ladder, but no one wants to climb a ladder on the job.

According to a Job Openings and Labor Turnover Survey from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, roughly 200,000 construction jobs sit unfilled in the U.S. The demand for residential homes is far outpacing our capacity to build them. A recent survey by HomeAdvisor lays it out in bleak terms: Of the firms surveyed, 93 percent said they believed the labor shortage is standing in the way of their growth.

Those findings were precisely echoed by the GAF Contractor Labor Shortage Survey, which found only 7 percent of contractors surveyed reported the labor shortage was not having any effect on their businesses. The biggest issues identified were finding talent and project delays.

GAF Graph 1

Today, thousands of small businesses from coast to coast are feeling the effectt. Of the more than 1,000 construction firms participating in the 2018 Construction Outlook Survey, 75 percent predicted a need to expand their headcount in 2018 — up two points from 2017. Unfortunately a majority of firms expect it will either become harder or remain difficult to recruit and hire qualified workers in 2018.”

In other words, three out of four of these firms see opportunity on the horizon, but only one in five believe they’ll be able to hire enough professionals to capitalize on it.

The GAF Wealth Builder survey suggests a similar trend. More than two-thirds of responding contractors reported the labor shortage has had a moderate or significant impact on their business. Difficulty finding talent and project delays were the biggest negative impacts.

Because there are so many more roofing jobs available than crews to install them, it has become, in many ways, a seller’s market for labor.

Where have all the workers gone?

There are possibly as many theories about the vanishing labor force as there are jobs waiting to be filled. But labor and industry experts often cite these three factors as driving the phenomenon:

  • The Housing Bubble – During the housing crisis of 2006-08, the construction industry lost approximately 40 percent of its workforce to other career paths, and those workers have, for the most part, not returned. Despite steady growth in demand for new houses, there is a lingering perception that construction — and residential construction in particular — is not a stable career choice. Making matters worse, when a million professionals walked away from construction, they took their hard-earned expertise.
  • Youth Perception – In recent decades, the perceived value of craft careers, and the training they demand has suffered a dramatic downturn. Not only has vocational education funding dried up in schools across the country, but the emphasis on “college for everyone” has created an impression that the trades are somehow less worthy career paths. Despite the popular desire for every young person to earn a college degree, more than 30 percent of U.S. high school students never complete four years of college. That means they enter the job market with neither a college degree nor the skills-based training they need to thrive in roofing, construction, manufacturing, or other non-degree careers. And the general dismissal of craft occupations appears to be self-perpetuating. The fewer people we prepare for careers in the trades, the less attractive those careers become. According to a 2017 poll of 2,001 young adults, ages 18 to 25, conducted for the National Association of Home Builders (NAHB), only 3 percent of those with career plans saw themselves working in construction. When asked what motivated respondents to choose a career, 76 percent overall said the career was something they were interested in and 48 percent said it suited their skills and abilities. Could this explain the lack of enthusiasm for craft careers? Can we expect students to dream of using skills that we no longer teach in their schools?

When asked what can be done to help the labor shortage, contractors participating in the GAF Wealth Builder survey most often indicated that focusing on trades in high school would be valuable.

GAF Graph 2

When asked to rate their agreement with ways to improve the labor issues, shifting the perceptions of roofing with young people had the greatest level of agreement among respondents.

  • Changing Demographics – As political and law enforcement spotlights burn brightly on the complex challenges of the U.S. immigration policy, one fact remains indisputable – as the Baby Boom generation ages into retirement, new immigrants currently account for all of the growth in the labor force. Research from NAHB indicates nearly 30 percent of the U.S. construction labor force is foreign-born and even higher for roofing workers at 43 percent. NAHB’s findings show overall 53 percent of the immigrant labor force was born in Mexico. Yet immigration (authorized and unauthorized) has slowed significantly in recent years, putting additional stress on employers looking for skilled construction labor.

National challenges demand national solutions

The National Roofing Contractors Association (NRCA) has been confronting these issues aggressively under the leadership of CEO Reid Ribble. As a former roofing contractor and former U.S. Representative from Wisconsin’s 8th District, Ribble has studied the problem from professional and policy perspectives.

“Listening to some of the national rhetoric about immigration some have a tendency to demonize the immigrant who wants to work here,” Ribble says. “I understand the difference between an undocumented immigrant and one who comes here legally. The latter — the one coming here legally — came here to work. And that’s a good thing.”

Ribble adds when sheer demographics are considered, 10,000 U.S. workers are retiring every day, and the workforce must be supplemented with immigrant labor. Combined with declining birth rates, there simply will not be enough workers to grow the economy without them.

He also has made industry perception a key focus of his work, recently concluding a nationwide tour of allied industry groups, trade gatherings such as the International Roofing Expo, and manufacturer conferences. His consistent message has been a call to reevaluate how we see ourselves.

“We can’t expect anyone to respect what we do until we respect what we do,” Ribble says. “As we begin to shift our own attitude on what we do and the importance of our work, the marketplace will automatically begin to follow us.”

Ribble is calling on the roofing industry to change the way those in the U.S. think about roofing.

“When you walk into a room and flip a switch, you just expect the lights to go on. When you flush a toilet or turn a tap, you expect the plumbing to respond. And when you call an electrician or a plumber, you look for a certified contractor,” he says. “We expect our roofs to perform, as well, so why don’t we look for master-level certification of our roofers? The roofing industry needs to increase the perceived value of what we do.”

To that end, NCRA is spearheading an effort to establish a nationally recognized professional certification program, with uniform standards, for steep- and low-slope roofing workers.

“Our goal is to be on par with our professional competitors in the other contruction-related fields,” Ribble says. “And we’re decades behind them in this regard.”

This year, Ribble and NRCA are embarking on a campaign to promote the good things the industry does.

Ribble points out the only time people hear about roofing contractors is when there’s a fall or an accident. People become aware of roofing when there’s a rainstorm and the building leaks or a snowstorm and the building collapses.

However, the facts about roofing professionals and their proud industry are less dramatic but far more positive.

“Many of our people are roofing the most prestigious buildings in the country,” Ribble says. “Some of our members are the most philanthropic businesspeople in their communities. We need to begin to tell their stories.”

This is not just a public relations effort, according to Ribble. Instead, it is a mission to elevate the industry — including its own self-perception — to the level it has earned through skill, hard work and professionalism.

“As roofing professionals, we’re a self-effacing, almost self-deprecating group of folks. We tend not to talk too much about the good things we do,” he says. “As a result, the public will see a story about a roofing fire but won’t hear about the contractor who quietly donates a roof to a church or puts up four or five roofs to support Habitat for Humanity. Those stories go untold because we are not sharing them. As we begin to tell the positive stories, collectively we will begin to reshape the perception of who we are.”

To catch more fish, cast a wider net

The construction labor shortage appears to have grown out of a complex mix of political, economic, demographic and educational factors. This means there might be no quick fix. But that’s not stopping the roofing industry from doing what it can to help build bridges between underemployed workers and open opportunities.

The skills and temperament necessary for roofing success can be found in any number of other professions.Thanks to creative outreach and training programs, military veterans, oil and gas workers, and former white collar workers are discovering fulfilling second careers on roofs.

Getting the message out

The current labor shortage is not a short-term glitch and won’t be solved with a specific program or campaign. Training…

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Venture Construction Group of Florida Raises Awareness for Domestic Violence with Annual Fundraiser

VCGFL- Kendra Scott Event for Gemma's Angels and AVDA - December 2017 (002)

In 2013, after fighting in a violent domestic dispute to protect her children, Boca Raton, Fla., resident Gemma Burkaloff lost her life at the hands of her husband.

This tragedy struck NRCA member Venture Construction Group of Florida (VCGFL), Boca Raton, especially hard. Operations manager Sandra Lawson is Burkaloff’s sister. She now is the co-founder of the Gemma’s Angels Foundation, which launched in 2014. It is dedicated to raising awareness to end domestic violence in honor of Burkaloff’s heroic fight to save her children.

Each year, VCGFL hosts a fundraiser to benefit the Gemma’s Angels Foundation as well as Aid to Victims of Domestic Violence (AVDA).

AVDA provides a state-certified domestic violence shelter, offering a comprehensive array of services for victims of domestic violence, including a 24-hour crisis hotline, emergency and transitional housing, advocacy, counseling, and support to help them live violence free and self-sufficient lives.

The fundraiser, The Kendra Gives Back Party, took place on December 13, 2017, and was co-hosted with leading fashion accessories designer Kendra Scott. The party was open to the public and included a shopping event featuring Kendra Scott accessories. Twenty percent of all sales proceeds went to benefit Gemma’s Angels Foundation and AVDA. The event raised $5,000 with $2,500 donated to each organization.

According to the National Domestic Violence Hotline, more than one in three women and more than one in four men in the U.S. have experienced physical violence and/or stalking by a spouse or significant other in their lifetime. The National Coalition of Domestic Violence states domestic violence is prevalent in every community, gender, race, religion or nationality.

“It is so important to continuously raise awareness about domestic violence. This is a tragic and pervasive issue that isn’t going to magically disappear,” Lawson says. “It doesn’t affect one person. It affects an entire family.”

Plans for a 2018 VCGFL Kendra Gives Back Party are currently being finalized and will take place later this year.

In addition, VCGFL and Gemma’s Angels will sponsor and participate in the Take a Stand Against Domestic Violence Walk in Marco Island, Fla., in October, which is Domestic Violence Awareness Month. VCGL is planning a toy drive to benefit children living at AVDA in December. For more information, visit http://www.vcgfl.com.

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Kalkreuth Roofing’s Annual Golf Outing is the Largest Fundraising Event for Local Easter Seals Rehabilitation Center

rwp savannaFor NRCA member Kalkreuth Roofing and Sheet Metal, Wheeling, W. Va., its 11-year partnership with the Edouard S. Ziegler Easter Seal Rehabilitation Center has always made sense.

“It’s a remarkable organization with a heartfelt commitment to serve those living with disabilities in our local community and beyond,” says John Kalkreuth, president and CEO of Kalkreuth Roofing and Sheet Metal. “We are humbled by the opportunity to provide a donation that continues to grow each year.”

Their annual event, the Kalkreuth Amatuer Golf Classic Benefiting Easter Seals at Oglesbay Resort’s Crispin Golf Course, raised more than $22,000 for Easter Seals in June 2017. Overall, the golf outing has raised more than $60,000 since the event’s inception.

This year’s event will take place June 14-16.

In recent years, Kalkreuth Roofing and Sheet Metal’s national vendor partners include ABC Supply Co. Inc., Beloit, Wis.; Johns Manville, Denver; Beacon Roofing Supply Inc., Herndon, Va.; Firestone Building Products, Nashville; and Allied Building Products Corp., East Rutherford, N.J. Sponsor support has provided extra revenue that has significantly increased Kalkreuth Roofing and Sheet Metal’s annual donation to Easter Seals.

“It’s our biggest third-party fundraising event,” says Melissa Marco, community relations krsm.jpgdirector at the Edoard S. Ziegler Easter Seals Rehabilitation Center. “The funds they raise are huge for our organization.”

Easter Seals provides children and adults with special needs with services that include medical rehabilitation, speech therapy, physical therapy, mental health services, day care and autism services.

The Edouard S. Ziegler Easter Seals Rehabilitation Center currently serves more than 2,000 children and provides nearly 20,000 home visits per year. No child seeking Easter Seals’ services is turned away.

The support provided by Kalkreuth Roofing and Sheet Metal has played a significant role in furthering Easter Seals’ mission of creating solutions that change lives for children and adults with special needs.

“Without Kalkreuth Roofiing and Sheet Metal’s continued friendship, the good work that happens at our center each day would not be possible,” says Jay Prager, CEO of the Edoard S. Ziegler Easter Seals Rehabilitation Center. “Their involvement helps Easter Seals to continue providing services to the many children and adults with special needs and their families in our area.”

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Generating Revenue with Commercial Roof Maintenance – GAF Blog

Studies say we only get 6.5 seconds to capture someone’s attention before their mind wanders off to some other message. If I had 6.5 seconds to communicate the wisdom of looking into commercial roof maintenance, I’d simply say “Potential margins of up to 60%.” That’s about 2.5 seconds. So, I’d say it again, more slowly: “Potential margins. Of up to. 60%.”

In my experience, that number is enough to grab the attention of most savvy businesspeople.

Among all the benefits of expanding into commercial roof maintenance, higher revenue is number one. But those revenues are, by no means, guaranteed. A successful roof maintenance program requires dedicated tools and personnel, a commitment to building long-term business relationships, and a business plan.

Let’s take those one at a time:

Dedicated Tools and Personnel

Chances are, if you install commercial roofs, you already own the tools required to maintain them. That reduces your initial capital outlay when branching into maintenance. You probably also have skilled employees who understand the fundamentals of the roofs you install. That means less incremental training. However, as the maintenance side of your business grows, I recommend creating a dedicated team, with their own equipment and maintenance-specific training, to ensure that your maintenance customers receive the same level of service as your new roof and reroof customers.

A Commitment to Building Long-Term Relationships

As you work on a new roof or a reroof, offering a maintenance contract gives you a unique opportunity to take “ownership” of that roof for the foreseeable future. Whether you build maintenance into your installation agreement or add it later, you can make the strong case that you know the roof inside and out, and are uniquely well-suited to take care of it. In fact, many contractors find it helps to offer upfront service at no cost for a specific time period, in order to demonstrate the value of the ongoing relationship. Turning a project into a long-term relationship enables you to grow your current business with existing clients. Down the road, you may find opportunities to restore the roof using coatings, or be the natural choice to eventually replace the roof.

Offering maintenance can also help you get your foot in the door with new clients. Including maintenance services in an initial new roof or reroof bid can help differentiate your company from other contractors.

Let your prospective client know that studies indicate a proactive maintenance program can lower the average life-cycle cost of a roof to $0.14 per square foot, versus $0.25 per square foot for a reactively maintained roof (that is, one where a contractor is brought in after a problem is discovered).

Have a Business Plan

Don’t dabble. When you’re ready to get into roof maintenance, make sure you have a plan and the right resources to carry it out. Commit to offering your existing customers a maintenance contract at every appropriate opportunity:

  • At the bid, incorporated in your proposal
  • At the 1-year inspection
  • During a warranty exchange
  • Until they say yes

To identify new customers, target organizations that are likely to embrace the convenience and  value of proactive maintenance, such as:

  • Owners of multiple facilities
  • Owners of large roof systems
  • Management companies

And think in terms of buildings that cannot conveniently close for extensive repairs, such as:

  • Hospitals
  • Schools
  • Churches
  • Nursing homes

Make sure your marketing campaign for commercial roof maintenance is as comprehensive as your new roof acquisition plan. Consider e-mail, direct mail, telemarketing, and social media. You may find it makes financial sense to offer two years of free inspections as an incentive.

Once you’ve decided commercial roof maintenance makes sense for your business model, you might also consider becoming a GAF Certified Maintenance Professional (CMP). Only a GAF CMP can offer the GAF WellRoof® Guarantee Extension to the GAF Diamond Pledge™ NDL Roof Guarantee. With the WellRoof® Guarantee Extension, GAF will extend the length of eligible GAF Diamond Pledge™ NDL Roof Guarantees by up to 25% — with no additional guarantee fee.

Look for more information on the WellRoof® extension in an upcoming post! Until then, feel free to reach out with questions in our comments section.

The post Generating Revenue with Commercial Roof Maintenance appeared first on GAF Blog.

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The All-New MetalRoofing.com Is Here


Metal Roofing Mobile Friendly

The Metal Roofing Alliance is proud to announce the launch of an industry-leading digital experience in home roofing with the all-new MetalRoofing.com.

 

Mobile-Friendly

Now you can take MetalRoofing.com anywhere. The all-new website is fully responsive and designed for an optimal experience on any device. Try it out on your phone now.

 

Beautiful Metal Roofing Image Gallery

Our revamped image gallery includes even more examples of beautiful homes with sleek and sturdy metal roofs, as well as filters that will allow you to quickly find the roof you want. It’s more structured and easier to use, plus you now have the ability to choose the color and roof type that looks best – try it for yourself.

 

“My New Metal Roof” Roofing Visualizer

The new free metal roofing visualizer tool is fully interactive. Use this online tool to literally see what a metal roof would look like on your home. Toggle through various styles and color options to find the one that’s right for you.Upload your home photo now. 

 

Enhanced Find-A-Contractor Search

New features on the find-a-contractor search include a simple, easy-to-submit form. Enjoy access to approved metal roofing installers with detailed company information, contact resources, and examples of past projects. Browse our list of MRA Member Contractors, each sponsored by one of our participating manufacturers.

 

Ask-The-Experts Forum

The all-new forum will give MetalRoofing.com users the ability to chat with highly engaged metal roofing professionals. No matter your question, you will have an expert available to answer at the click of a button.

 

Roofing Materials Comparison Chart

Learn how metal roofing compares to other materials like asphalt, tile or shake when it comes to true cost, warranty maintenance, aesthetic and the environment. See the comparison chart here.

 

Plus the latest on everything you need to know about metal roofing, industry trends, and so much more!

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NRCA Urges Consumers to Recognize National Roofing Week 2018, Identify Local Contractor in Preparation for Summer Storms

NRW Thunderclap-Graphic

NRCA is urging communities to recognize the significance of roofs to every home and business during National Roofing Week, which takes place June 3-9. NRCA also is reminding consumers National Roofing Week comes at the beginning of summer storm season and encourages them to prepare for severe summer weather by identifying a local roofing contractor before a storm hits.

Severe summer weather often is followed by fraudulent contractors who show up and attempt to prey on the emotions of homeowners and business owners whose roofs have been badly damaged by a tornado, hail storm or hurricane.

During National Roofing Week, NRCA is urging consumers to research and find a reputable local roofing contractor ahead of the storm. Having this information in advance will protect storm victims from also becoming the victims of a fraudulent contractor.

“National Roofing Week comes at a time when knowing your local roofing contractor is more important than ever,” says Reid Ribble, NRCA’s CEO. “Homeowners and business owners should protect themselves by putting their roofing contractor’s phone number on their refrigerator or in their cell phone in case of emergency.”

The roof is one of the most important components of a structure. It is the first line of defense against natural elements such as rain, snow or wind, yet it is often taken for granted until it falls into disrepair. During National Roofing Week, NRCA also encourages its members to participate by engaging in their communities and informing the public about the essential role roofs and professional roofing contractors play in every community.

NRCA will recognize National Roofing Week by highlighting the work, training and good deeds of its members and their employees on its various social media outlets.

Additional information about National Roofing Week can be found at www.nrca.net/roofingweek.

To find a local roofing contractor in your area, visit NRCA’s consumer website at www.everybodyneedsaroof.com.

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Celebrate National Roofing Week with GAF and the NRCA! – GAF Blog

The National Roofing Contractor Association (NRCA) will kick off the 2018 National Roofing Week (NRW) on Sunday, June 3. GAF has a full week of events scheduled to help recognize the important work that roofers do in their communities. Check our Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram pages for daily stories, photos and features on roofing contractors and the positive impact you make.

Let’s Get Social

We invite you to share your own photos and stories on social media. Either use the hashtag #nationalroofingweek and tag GAF on Facebook and/or Instagram during Roofing Week, or submit your stories and photos beforehand and we might feature them on our pages! Each day of National Roofing Week, GAF social media will focus on a different topic, so check back each day for updates on:

Click here to submit your stories and photos!

  • Monday, June 4: Employee Appreciation Day
    • Share stories of the outstanding workers on your crew.
  • Tuesday, June 5: Employee Training
    • What are you doing to raise the game of your employees?
  • Wednesday, June 6: Charity
    • Roofers are often among the most generous businesspeople in their communities. What are you doing to give back?
  • Thursday, June 7: Residential and Commercial Project Showcase
    • Show us the fruits of your labor! Send photos and background on the projects that fill you with pride.
  • Friday, June 8: National Roofing Week Wrap-up

NRCA Thunderclap Campaign

The NRCA has also launched a social media blitz campaign on the Thunderclap service. On June 3, a unified message celebrating National Roofing Week will be automatically posted on Facebook, Twitter and Tumblr on behalf of all participating roofing contractors. Register to participate here.

We look forward to spending the week honoring the important work you do every day!

The post Celebrate National Roofing Week with GAF and the NRCA! appeared first on GAF Blog.



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The All-New MetalRoofing.com – Coming Soon!


Metal Roofing Mobile Friendly

The Metal Roofing Alliance is preparing to launch a brand new digital experience in home roofing with the all-new MetalRoofing.com. New features will include:

 

Mobile-Friendly

Now you will be able to take MetalRoofing.com anywhere. The all-new website will be fully responsive and designed for an optimal experience on any device.

Beautiful Metal Roofing Image Gallery

Our revamped image gallery will include even more examples of beautiful homes with sleek and sturdy metal roofs, as well as filters that will allow you to quickly find the roof you want.

“My New Metal Roof” Roofing Visualizer

The new free metal roofing visualizer tool will be fully interactive. You will be able to use this online tool to literally see what a metal roof would look like on your home. Toggle through various styles and color options to find the one that’s right for you.

Enhanced Find-A-Contractor Search

New features on the find-a-contractor search include a simple, easy-to-submit form. Enjoy access to approved metal roofing installers with detailed company information, contact resources, and examples of past projects.

Ask-The-Experts Forum

The all-new forum will give MetalRoofing.com users the ability to chat with highly engaged metal roofing professionals. No matter your question, you will have an expert available to answer at the click of a button.

Roofing Materials Comparison Chart

Learn how metal roofing compares to other materials like asphalt, tile or shake when it comes to true cost, warranty maintenance, aesthetic and the environment.

 

Plus the latest on everything you need to know about metal roofing, industry trends, and so much more!

Follow us on these social networks to be the first to know when the new MetalRoofing.com goes live!

Twitter – Facebook – Instagram – Pinterest



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Posted in: metal roof, metal roofing, metal roofing alliance, my new metal roof, new MetalRoofing.com website, Uncategorized

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